Conspiracy theorist

Where’s the compassion for drug users?

 by Mark Luedtke


News Flash: Dayton has serious drug problems. The Dayton Daily News seemingly just discovered this. In a recent seven-day period, I counted 18 “war on drug” articles in my DDN newsfeed. That’s more war on drug articles than I remember in the previous six months. I don’t know if propagandists were trying to distract people from the Obamacare roll-out disaster, if drug warriors asked for propaganda because the Drug Enforcement Agency’s and other programs’ budget growth has been reduced, or both, but the DDN got the memo. Overnight, drugs became a major problem.

Heroin and opiate use is running rampant. A dead University of Dayton law student had heroin in his apartment. Montgomery County has an Opiate Task Force. Drug task forces proliferate like rabbits and hunt like wolves. Fat lot of good they did for that UD student.

But most articles focused on prescription drug abuse. Some might find it ironic that prescription drugs – produced by government’s corporations, controlled by government and prescribed by government-trained-and-approved doctors – are a major problem. But if you think about it, that’s exactly what one should expect. Every problem government purports to try to solve, it makes worse. Education, health care, poverty, crime, roads and bridges, and drug abuse. Everything.

Two themes dominate those articles. First: the war on drugs is a failure. While Nixon famously institutionalized the phrase “war on drugs,” the federal drug war officially began in 1914 with the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act. Local drug laws go back before the Civil War. Yet, drugs are cheaper, more deadly and more readily available than ever.

The headline of one article informed, “Cheap prices, gangs saturating southwest Ohio with pain killers, heroin.” The article continued, “The growth of prescription pill use and the cheap cost of heroin means law enforcement’s battle with opiate-based drugs across southwest Ohio is fought on several fronts – from the streets to the schools, hospitals and courts.” A century of immorally attacking drug users with jackboots and bullets has made things worse, not better.

The second dominant theme of the articles is government needs more jackboots and bullets to win the war on drugs. This from the same government whose shrinks hand out psychotic drugs to healthy schoolchildren like they’re Halloween candy and whose drug warriors are hooked on steroids. Apparently none of the reporters asked the question, “Since a century of jackboots and bullets has failed to win the war on drugs so far, what makes you think more jackboots and bullets will win it now?” Or maybe they did. Neither the question nor a response appears in any article though.

You might think the government should try a different approach, but it can’t. Because the state is a coercive institution – it funds itself through theft and it forces its will on others through threats of violence backed by violence – it can never be anything but jackboots and bullets papered over with thinly veiled threats.

Lawrence Vance, author of the book “Social Insecurity, The War on Drugs is a War on Freedom,” wrote: “The war on drugs is a failure. It has failed to prevent drug abuse. It has failed to keep drugs out of the hands of addicts. It has failed to keep drugs away from teenagers. It has failed to reduce the demand for drugs. It has failed to stop the violence associated with drug trafficking. It has failed to help drug addicts get treatment. It has failed to have an impact on the use or availability of most drugs in the United States.”

It’s worse than a failure. If it did nothing, it would be a failure, but drug abuse and violence associated with drugs skyrocketed because of the jackboots-and-bullets approach, just as alcohol abuse and the violence associated with alcohol skyrocketed during Prohibition.

But in the way that matters most to our greedy rulers, the war on drugs is a phenomenal success. Action America conservatively estimated government spent more than $50 billion – stolen from taxpayers – fighting the war on drugs in 2011. All that money lines the pockets of politicians, SWAT teams, prosecutors, judges, jailers and the army of bureaucrats that support them. Drug warriors don’t want to give up that stolen loot and get cooperative jobs where they’re not allowed to kick in doors, shoot unarmed grandparents and dogs and kidnap children from their parents. That estimate doesn’t include bank and corporate profits.

There’s always going to be a handful of self-destructive people who harm themselves with drugs, but most don’t want that. Most methamphetamine abusers don’t want their teeth to rot out of their heads and then die. Most Krokodil abusers don’t want their flesh eaten away from the inside until they die. This is an obscene consequence of government’s domination of society through coercion. It’s taken people’s hope. Between government’s coercive schools, welfare, war on drugs and economy, people are losing hope.

Compassion is the solution. If we end all of the state’s jackboot-and-bullet programs, people will become free to work together, regain hope, save each other and cooperatively improve their lives.

The views and opinions expressed in Conspiracy Theorist are the views and/or opinions of the author and do not reflect the views and/or opinions of the Dayton City Paper or Dayton City Media and are published strictly for entertainment purposes only.

 Mark Luedtke is an electrical engineer with a degree from the University of Cincinnati and currently works for a Dayton attorney. He can be reached at


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Mark Luedtke
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