conspiracy theorist

Minimum wage, maximum ignorance

 by Mark Luedtke

 

If we lived in a rational, moral society, there’d be a lot of job openings at Walmart right now. On Nov. 18, Walmart employees rallied outside the Butler Township store. The rally was announced by UFCW Local 75, even though Walmart employees are not unionized. When employees act in a way that harms their employer, they should be fired for harming their colleagues. Unfortunately, we don’t live in a rational or moral society. We live in a society dominated by threats of violence from the government, which won’t allow Walmart to simply fire employees who are hurting its business. That’s because Walmart employees far outnumber their employers, so politicians cater to them – legalizing their aggression against their employers – to buy their votes.

Funny how these people, so unhappy with their jobs, don’t quit. That’s because they can’t get a better job anywhere else. They should be grateful for the jobs Walmart gave them, but no, they want the government to overrule the contract they voluntarily agreed to, steal money from Walmart and give it to them.

Unions keep trying to get into Walmart with no success. That’s because Walmart provides a relatively good workplace for unskilled workers in our state-run economy. People can get raises by watching training videos, but the malcontents choose to protest instead of watching them.

This protest is part of the minimum wage madness sweeping the country. Three out of four Americans support increasing the federal minimum wage. The Dayton Daily News reported: “The workers are seeking job improvements and higher income. The release said workers want minimum salaries for all of at least $25,000 annually.” California plans to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour. In August, fast food workers across the country went on strike for $15 per hour. Washington D.C.’s mayor recently vetoed a bill to raise the minimum wage at big box stores to $12.50 per hour.

Robyn Pennacchia, writing at Death and Taxes Magazine, put her economic ignorance on display, “Welp, it looks like the little guy lost this time. The Large Retailers Accountability Act, a law that would have required big box retailers to pay their workers a whopping $12.50 an hour in Washington, D.C., was vetoed earlier today by Vincent Gray, the city’s mayor. Why? Because Walmart threatened to not open ‘six new megastores’ in the city if it passed. Gray, who had been ever-so supportive of Walmart’s plans for new D.C. stores, called the act a ‘job killer.’”

He called it a job killer because it is a job killer. I understand agitators for a higher minimum wage were miseducated by the government for the benefit of our rulers in government schools, but transactions in the marketplace illustrate the law of demand. If you work at Walmart, you know if you raise the price of an apple, people will buy fewer apples. If you work at McDonald’s, you know if you raise the price of a Big Mac, people will buy fewer Big Macs.

In the same way, if you raise the price of unskilled workers, people will hire fewer unskilled workers. There are no exceptions to the law of demand. Every worker should understand this. People asking government to use coercion to raise the minimum wage are literally asking government to bankrupt their companies and wipe out their jobs. And minorities always suffer the most.

Similarly, this is why unions have nearly gone extinct in the private sector and why they’re so desperate to take over Walmart. If they succeed, they’ll bankrupt it, too.

CNNMoney promoted the ignorance too: “It’s a good day for low-wage workers in … the city of SeaTac, Wash., after residents on Tuesday favored ballot measures that will raise the minimum wage [to $15 per hour].” It wasn’t a good day for the workers who will lose their jobs and for the business owners who will lose their businesses.

People pushing to raise the minimum wage don’t understand cause and effect, either. They don’t grasp that taxes, regulations and the Federal Reserve increase the disparity between rich and poor. The more government intervenes in the economy, the richer the plutocrats, politicians and their cronies get and the poorer everybody else gets. Because of the coercive nature of government, it can never be any other way. Nobody covets the power of coercion to make themselves poorer.

Thomas Sowell explained minimum wage laws don’t benefit the poor: “There was a time when there was no federal minimum wage law in the United States. The last time was during the Coolidge administration, when the annual unemployment rate got as low as 1.8 percent.” There’s nothing compassionate about putting people out of work and making it harder for others to get jobs.

Minimum wage laws also keep people from climbing the economic ladder. Stocking shelves and flipping burgers are supposed to be stepping stones to more productive careers, not careers in themselves.

True compassion would be ending government’s minimum wage aggression so people can find jobs, cooperate and climb the economic ladder to success.

The views and opinions expressed in Conspiracy Theorist are the views and/or opinions of the author and do not reflect the views and/or opinions of the Dayton City Paper or Dayton City Media and are published strictly for entertainment purposes only.

 Mark Luedtke is an electrical engineer with a degree from the University of Cincinnati and currently works for a Dayton attorney. He can be reached at MarkLuedtke@DaytonCityPaper.com.

 

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