Conspiracy Theorist 7/17: Hooray for Domino’s

Y ear after year, the same roads are torn up and road crews patch them. But they never really repair them. They put temporary patches on the roads because road repair is about creating socialist jobs and buying votes, not really repairing roads. This is the modern version of paying people to dig ditches then […]

Finally somebody is fixing roads

By Mark Luedtke

Year after year, the same roads are torn up and road crews patch them. But they never really repair them. They put temporary patches on the roads because road repair is about creating socialist jobs and buying votes, not really repairing roads. This is the modern version of paying people to dig ditches then fill them back in.

But Domino’s Pizza has a solution: it will repair the roads, and it will be more effective because of the profit motive. The government wants to spend as much money as possible to buy as many votes for rulers as possible for as long as possible. The profit motive means Domino’s wants to spend as little money as possible. It wants repairs to last so it doesn’t have to spend money repairing the same roads over and over.

Noah Smith doesn’t get it. Writing in the Chicago Tribune, Smith laments, “[Private sector initiatives], in and of themselves, are good things. It’s good for potholes to be fixed, homeless people to be housed, and traffic congestion to be relieved. But the fact that it’s private companies taking these steps is an ominous sign for the nation. It suggests a breakdown in the government’s ability or willingness to carry out one of its core functions—the efficient provision of public goods.”

Smith drank the Kool-Aid. Rulers talk about providing public goods, but that’s a cover for the real purpose of government: stealing as much money as possible without the victims of the theft resisting. Smith acknowledges problems with the public goods baloney, but he can’t see through it. “A public good is something that one person can use without making it less available to another person—in other words, a good that doesn’t get ‘used up,’ in the way that goods like food or cars do,” he writes. “In reality, there are few perfectly public goods in the textbook sense. But lots of things have some public aspect to them, because they create positive spillovers that benefit people who don’t pay for them.”

But all material goods are scarce and get used up. Roads wear out. Traffic jams fill them. The same with airports, dams, missiles, etc. On the other side, every good benefits everybody else. My education directly benefits me and indirectly benefits everybody else by making me more productive. That doesn’t mean you must pay for it by having your money stolen in the form of taxes. If I produce 1,000 apples to trade, the world reaps the benefit of 1,000 more apples. That doesn’t mean you must pay for my orchard. The public goods argument is cover for government’s stealing.

The initiatives Smith identifies show that government as we know it—coercive government—is nearing its end. Government is failing at everything. Everybody can see through its phony arguments for legitimacy. Roads in every city, county, and state are in shambles. Thousands of bridges are in danger of collapse.

And it’s not just infrastructure. After one hundred years, the War on Drugs has produced nothing but death and misery except for the drug warriors and profiteers enriched by it. Homelessness, health care, and schools are getting worse.

Nowhere is it more obvious government does more harm than good than in the foreign policy arena. For example, Craig Murray writes, “… NATO is a demonstrably useless institution. Its largest ever active military deployment, for 12 years in Afghanistan, resulted in military defeat throughout 80% of the country, the installation of a pocket regime whose scrip does not run further than you can throw the scrip, and a vast outflow of heroin to finance the criminal underworld throughout NATO countries.”

If you like mass murder, Americans in body bags, the heroin epidemic, and wasting $1 trillion, you should support the Afghan war. If you don’t like these things, you can’t support it unless you suffer from cognitive dissonance.

In the past, growth in capital improved the standard of living for previous generations despite the looting by government. That covered up government’s lies about legitimacy. Capital, not government, made things work. But government looting has expanded to the point where it’s consuming capital, reducing our standard of living. One of the most obvious indicators of capital consumption is the rusted shells of buildings you see all over the country, especially in Dayton because of unusually bad local government.

The more we expose government’s failures and falsehoods, the sooner it will get out of our way. Only then can we repair our economy and society.

The views and opinions expressed in Conspiracy Theorist are the views and/or opinions of the author and do not reflect the views and/or opinions of the Dayton City Paper or Dayton City Media and are published strictly for entertainment purposes.

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Reach DCP freelance writer Mark Luedtke at MarkLuedtke@DaytonCityPaper.com.

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