DCP Summer Wheat Ale Recipe

DCP Summer Wheat Ale

Malt

3.3 lbs.  Wheat Liquid Malt Extract

3.3 lbs.  Liquid Light Malt Extract

Hops

0.50 oz. Saaz hops pellets (5% alpha acid), boiled 60 min.

0.50 oz. Styrian Goldings hops pellets (6% alpha acid), boiled 15 min.

0.50 oz. Saaz hops pellets (5% alpha acid), added after the boil

Yeast

White Labs WLP300 Hefewizen Ale

Other

6 gallons of bottled spring water

Large bag of ice

¾ cup priming sugar

2 cups bottled water

Brewing

1.  Heat 3 gallons of water on your stove. Just before the water boils, turn the stove off (to avoid boil over) and add all of the malt syrup and 0.5 oz of Saaz hops pellets (these hops add bitterness to the beer). Restart the stove.

2.  Bring the mixture, now called wort, to a roiling boil. Be sure to stir regularly so it doesn’t scald or boil over. As the wort boils, start sanitizing your fermentation bucket and lid, airlock and thermometer/hydrometer. At 45 minutes of boiling, add 0.5 oz of Styrian Goldings hops (these hops add flavor).

3.  After the wort has boiled for 60 minutes total, turn the stove off and add 0.5 oz of Saaz hops (these last hops will add aroma to your beer).

4.  Fill your sink with ice and water. Gently set the wort kettle in the ice bath, letting it rest until the outside of the pot is barely warm to the touch or the wort is roughly room temperature. This can take 20 to 30 minutes. Take care to ensure that nothing lands in the open kettle.

5.  Once the wort has reached room temperature, pour it and the remaining gallons of water into the fermentation bucket. Using the sanitized hydrometer/thermometer, record the temperature and specific gravity of the wort. The specific gravity is a measure of how much sugar is in the wort. For this beer, the gravity should be around 1.047.

6.  Finally, add the yeast to the wort. No need to stir – just dump it in. Place the lid and airlock on the fermentation bucket. Be sure to put a little bit of bottled water in the airlock.

Fermenting

1.  Place the fermentation bucket in a cool, dark place. Within a day or two you will see bubbles in the airlock as the yeast eats the sugars and converts them to alcohol and carbon dioxide.

2.  After about two weeks, or once the activity in the airlock ceases, sanitize your hydrometer, open the lid and take another gravity reading. The gravity should be around 1.011. If not, close the lid up and wait another week.

3.  Once the gravity reaches roughly 1.011, it’s time to bottle your brew.

Bottling

1.  Wash and sanitize all of your bottles and bottle caps.

2.  Boil ¾ cup priming sugar in 2 cups of bottled water. Dump the sugar water into bottling bucket. This sugar water will give the yeast a final boost once in the bottle, carbonating your beer. Use the siphon to transfer your finished and fermented beer into the bottling bucket. Take care to not splash the transferring beer and avoid starting the siphon using your mouth, lest you introduce bacteria into your first batch.

3.  Use the bottling tube and wand to fill each empty bottle. Be sure to leave about an inch of head space. Loosely fit the caps to the bottles then use the capper to seal them.

4.  Let the bottles sit in a warm spot. After about two weeks, they should be fully carbonated, so call some friends over and toast to your first batch!

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Debate Forum: 7/19/16

Screen Shot 2016-07-19 at 10.14.32 AM

Sit down, G.I. Jane Should women be blocked from registering for the draft? By Sarah Sidlow U.S. Rep. Warren Davidson […]

Debate Forum: 7/12/16

toon

Duped or doped? Heroin addicts: criminals or victims? By Sarah Sidlow Here’s an interesting bit of trivia courtesy of Cleveland.com: […]

Jes McMillan’s Mosaic Institute

_M9A0817 - Bill Franz

by Bill Franz Photo: The Mosaic Institute serves artists at 43 S. Main St. in Miamisburg; photo: Bill Franz Most artists […]

Vitality Check: 6/21/16

326_4429495

Sometimes we’re just blowing germs By Rocco Castellano You go to the gym, restaurant, local coffee shop or bar and […]

Tinker, tailor, sculptor guy

04Deceptionsofparadiseandperdition_1

Landon Crowell ‘alters’ time and space at YS Arts Council By Terri Gordon What do beeswax, maple branches and an […]