Debate Forum Right 12/15/10

Debate Forum Right 12/15/10

DREAM Act: The Democrat Re-Election Act

By David Karki

David Karki

One of the several awful bills that can’t-be-former-Speaker-soon-enough Nancy Pelosi lame-duck-marched through the chamber in the last few days was the DREAM Act.

To be sure, the Democrats’ main interest in this is that they can rubber-stamp millions of new Democratic votes to replace all those they lost when they suffered the biggest mid-term defeat in U.S. history. The overwhelming majority of these new instant citizens would have a direct financial interest in keeping, if not growing, welfare state programs, not to mention be influenced by racial loyalty and groupthink in their voting patterns. As such, the Democrats can’t wait to say to all those evil tea partiers and other voters who turned against them: “If you won’t re-elect us for life, we’ll just find someone else who will!”

Of course, the Republicans are nowhere to be found on this issue, so terrified are they of the race card being played against them, trumpeted by the Democrats’ media allies.

What would immigration policy look like if I could wave a magic wand and make it reality?

•  Step One:  Border Security. Seeing that any border open enough for migrant workers and drug dealers to slip across is open enough for a terrorist to sneak WMDs across, I would build the biggest, most un-traversable wall in history from San Diego, CA to Brownsville, TX.

No one would leave their home without closing and locking the doors and windows on their home, if not enabling a full-blown security system. That’s all this is, in principle, just on a corporate instead of an individual level. The alternative is a terrorist getting a weapon that could kill millions onto American soil. The least we can do to prevent it is the same thing that anyone with common sense would to prevent their own home from being burglarized:  shut and lock the door.

And without first stopping the flow, the rest of the discussion is entirely academic. What good is shutting and locking the door if the window beside it sits open? Or what good is bailing out a boat if water keeps pouring in through a leak?

Since Congress and the federal government have proven repeatedly that they cannot ever be trusted to do this – so much so that President Obama committed treason in suing Arizona to prevent it from exercising its right to individual and corporate self-defense against any and all persons and entities who’d cross that wide-open border to perpetrate crime and evil – it may well fall to the people to take the initiative themselves.

Step Two:  Dealing with those already here. Now that the spigot has been turned off, and enforcement will have some real teeth to it, since those deported will have a much harder time coming back, we can deal with those already here.

This is where I part company with some conservatives. It’s wholly impractical to forcibly deport every illegal in one large fell swoop, and attempting to do so would become ugly and violent in a real hurry. Nobody would willingly go back to a third-world craphole dominated by drug lords and awash in violence, which is what Mexico is. They would fight tooth and nail to stay.

So what do we do? By all means, strictly enforce employment laws and unapologetically punish hirers who break them. And deport, a few at a time as they are caught, any and all new illegal aliens that are found.

Second, let illegal aliens know that we will do everything we can to not reward their criminality any further than what letting them stay represents. No chain migration – you want a family reunion, head back home. No voting, at least for some period of time – if you break the law to enter, you lose the privilege of having a voice in making it. Paying of a fine and/or reimbursing to whatever extent is practical the cost one incurred upon the taxpaying American citizens for prior use of public schools, hospitals, and prisons.

There could be more than this, but in exchange for letting them stay, I think it’s a fair deal.

• Step Three:  Cleaning up Where They Came From. The last logical step to this is to do what we can to stop the flow from reaching that wall in the first place.

Mexico, as already stated, is a total craphole run by drug lords. They count on being able to export their excess people to the American southwest and taking their criminal behavior with them, while sending back dollars. It’s especially sad when they could so easily be prosperous and stable off oil and tourism alone.

All options – including whatever measure of military force it takes to shut down the drug cartels that really run the place – should be on the table so that at the soonest possible juncture, Mexico becomes a place people aren’t fleeing.

I would think that the building of the impenetrable security wall on the border might act as the metaphorical cork on the bottle of shaken champagne; that with their main release valve now shut tight, the pressure will find another way to escape. One way might be that all those who flee Mexico only to wave its flag in our face might just screw up the nerve that America’s Founders had and pledge their lives, fortunes, and sacred honor to take their country back from the drug kingpins. Failing that, we may have to take action for our own security beyond that which the wall would bring about.

I don’t pretend to have any pie-in-the-sky fantasies about turning Mexico around overnight. But you can only play so much defense, and that’s what the wall would be. At some point, you have to go on offense and score some points in order to win the game.

So there you have it; my informal, unofficial policy white paper on illegal aliens and border security. Hopefully it’s founded on and driven by common sense, first principles, and reality. Certainly it’s founded on something better than what the DREAM Act is, which is pure selfish interest.

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