Free Speech 3/29/11

Keeping sanity in the media
I cannot express my appreciation in any stronger term than respect for your story on [the] environmental meltdown [in Japan]. I find some hope left to our country knowing that a person of your insight and common sense will help keep some degree of logic in the media.
Good work Mark.

– Richard Maddux
Dayton, Ohio

[RE: DCP’s Commentary Forum, 3/22/11]

Christian bashing “not cute”
Earlier today, like ya know, I viewed and listened to PAUL at a local matinee picture show. It was a cute, clever, comical movie, except for the tired and stereotypical Christian scenes depicted by a couple of crazy Christian characters: deranged and strange until one of them [the lady love interest] changed. I laughed at and enjoyed it, but wish that the writers and producers had not employed or enjoyed this tired old technique to get some laughs at Christian expense.
I think that mean moronic murderous misogynist Muslim macho men and their intolerant Islamic fanatic followers and friends would be more relevant comical targets; if only for the sake of diversity, multicultural inclusion and PG perversity. Most of us know that those Muslim folks can likewise laugh at and tolerate religious jokes without hateful responses.

– Leon Harrison
West Carrollton, Ohio

Another rant about Congress
Our new ultra conservative Congress reflects the primitive collective judgment of the American voter about debt.
Their logical sounding canard is, “It’s our money and we can decide better than government how to spend it.”
In the first place, most people use other people’s money from banks, not their own money, and they don’t spend it well. They go miles deep into personal debt.
Furthermore, their paycheck is not as much theirs as it is the holders of house and car and credit card loans. These creditors have first claims on most of it.
Also,  government cannot be run like a personal home budget.  A personal or business budget and a government budget are not alike.
Personal and business budgets end in bankruptcy because the value of assets used as collateral is limited and lenders lose confidence in borrowers’ ability to repay.
While government mis-spends, it is unlikely to go bankrupt because its assets and power to raise money are almost limitless. Governments always pay their debts, usually bondholders. Bankruptcy of governments is exceedingly rare and never among modern industrialized nations.
And it would be difficult to imagine more misspending than is done by private Wall Street. It loaned money on worthless property, paid billions for worthless paper, insured against risk with insurers who couldn’t pay, invested  in hot air and fond dreams. While a few walked away with millions of dollars, millions of Americans lost their jobs and homes not because of government but because of these private money movers.
We should cease focusing on government as cause of our problem and look more at the private companies and their lobbyists, big private financial operators who don’t pay their share of the costs of running the government.

– Paul R. Cooper
Yellow Springs, Ohio

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