Having a threesome

Having a threesome

No pain, no gain in the TriTroyathlon 2011

By Tim Walker

The TriTroyathlon includes canoeing for two-and-a-half miles. Photo courtesy of Jeff Coudron.

For some people, the idea of a relaxing Sunday morning in April might include sedate, everyday activities like sleeping in, watching a little TV, drinking a cup of coffee, reading the newspaper on the back porch, maybe even doing a little yard work. Relaxing, pastoral and calm.
For others, there’s the TriTroyathlon 2011.
If you’re one of those active types who’d rather spend a Sunday morning canoeing two-and-a-half miles, then biking for 17 miles and then finishing it all up with a four-mile run, and doing it all for a good cause, then Treasure Island Park in Troy is the place for you on April 17.
I promise you, there will be no shortage of sweat.
Wade Westfall is one of those active types, and he founded and has organized the TriTroyathlon each year since 2009. “The triathlon began a few years ago after the bike path was completed along the Great Miami River,” he said. “I saw it as an opportunity to highlight our community, and the great park system and river corridor that Troy has to offer.”
“After competing in a number of triathlons throughout the area, I believed Troy and the venue at Treasure Island would lend itself perfectly to holding a great event,” Westfall continued. “My wife and I, along with the Coudrons from Speedy Feet, wanted to tie it into our church’s effort to raise money and awareness for the Sudan/Darfur project sponsored through Ginghamsburg Church. In the past 2 years we have raised over $6,000 to help the people that are being harmed by the genocide taking place there, and all net proceeds go to the project.”
The TriTroyathlon serves as the Series Championship race for this year’s Speedy Feet series. Speedy Feet, which is run by Jeffrey Coudron and Brian Snell, is a local organization of runners that helps manage and time races and triathlons in the Miami Valley, and they’re dedicated to promoting healthy lifestyles and exercise. Their website, www.speedy-feet.com, makes it easy for runners to learn about new races, and to schedule and register online for the local races they want to compete in.
Though still young, the TriTroyathlon has proven itself to be a great success, said Westfall, a past winner of the Speedy Feet series, and it attracts a growing number of participants each year. “Out biggest field yet has been about 140 participants. This year, with the popularity of the relay division and because this race is the Series Championship for Speedy Feet, we are hoping for over 200 participants.”
The relay division has made the triathlon much more popular and makes it easier for more people to participate. “Most competitors race as a two-person team, paddling together in a canoe and then both partners biking and running – the canoe is provided as part of your entry fee.” said Westfall. “This year, we’re expecting about 30 participants to compete in the solo division. Solo competitors use a single-person kayak before completing the bike and run segments. Growing in popularity though, is another division – the relay. Relay teams consist of one or two paddlers, one biker and one runner. One of the paddlers can also compete in the bike or run segments, but they don’t have to. The relay allows more people to get involved who otherwise would find the entire event intimidating by themselves.”
“The event is great for spectators because they can see all three events along the levee,” Westfall continued. “Everything starts and finishes at Treasure Island Park. The canoe course starts by heading north on the river to a turnaround and then south to the train bridge before heading north again to Treasure Island. It passes under both the Adams Street and Market Street bridges. The 17-mile biking portion starts with a short segment through town before heading out onto some of the country roads north of Troy and back. Then the run is the best part as the participants run up the levee to the bike path, cross the Adams Street Bridge, then turn left along Riverside and back to the bike path to the turnaround, then return to Treasure Island park for the finish line.”
“Entry fees are $80 per team, but we’ve made it so teams can compete for free by simply getting a sponsor. And all the money is going to a good cause – one new water well for people in the Darfur region can cost up to $15,000, and we’ve raised over $6,000 from the triathlon over just the past few years.”

Start time, entry forms, and more information on the TriTroyathlon can be found at www.speedy-feet.com or by contacting Wade Westfall at wade8276@yahoo.com or Jeffrey Coudron at jeffrey_coudron@yahoo.com.

Reach DCP freelance writer Tim Walker at timwalker@daytoncitypaper.com.

Tim Walker, 46, was raised by wolves in W.V. after being abandoned by his family. Currently writing two mystery novels, he loves books, offbeat films, Miles Davis and pizza. He has broken his back twice, works as a DJ, loves his wife & kids and rarely howls at the moon these days, unless it's full.

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