On the Beat 09/15

Buch gets a tip

By Jim Bucher

Boy, did I get an earful, or rather an inbox full of responses from my column on tipping in the Aug. 18 edition of Dayton City Paper.

It seems I touched a nerve or two.

Most people were in agreement that service industry workers survive on tips, but others strongly disagree.

For the record, I stated, “If you can’t afford a 15 to 20 percent tip while eating out … then don’t go.”

A Lean Cuisine awaits in the microwave.

Allen writes, “Minimum wage for tipped employees is half of that paid to industrial and retail workers. Restaurant waitstaff only get around $4 an hour in most cases. All restaurants are different. When I worked as a bartender, I’d never have made it on that money but I had my own business at the time and that was my main income.”

John number one says, “Exactly!!! Some waiters work on minimum wage.”

John number two adds, “Love it Buch. Preach on! $$$.”

Thanks John, see you in church.

Theresa writes, “I’ve been a bartender for 25 years. Also went to Imperial Car Wash on Tuesday, tipped both guys $5 each. Watched a Cadillac owner have the other employee wipe inside his trunk! Hope he tipped!”

Me too.

Jill says I’m right on the money: “Jim you got it going on! Service jobs suck. Low wages, need tips. They do best they can.”

Yes they do.

Susan’s take: “Good service means different things to different people. We travel and eat out a lot, but we always tip something. I don’t like it when the servers ask us the dreaded Midwest, ‘How’s that tastin’ for ya’?’ question. (The proper question would be something more akin to ‘How is everything?’ And follow up with, ‘Is there anything else I can do for you right now?’ Because dining out is about more than how the food tastes. How did they forget that? Anyway, we tip because we know most people wouldn’t take the crap servers put up with if they had a better choice. We also tip our housekeeper, cabbies/shuttle driver, baggage handlers, salon personnel, buffet table, etc. We believe it reflects on our character and compassion for fellow humans.”

Right on Susan. You rock.

Kimberly says, “Thank you for writing about this, Jim. I also have a child that is a server. On slow weekday nights, he can only make $20 for working seven hours, so decent tips on the weekend barely even things out. These kids aren’t getting rich!”

Scott’s take: “‘Don’t get involved in a land war in Southeast Asia’ is a pretty good tip for truly awful service, but normally I leave at least 15 percent.”

’Nuff said.

Dewey writes, “Go out to eat and support your local restaurant owner and instead of the $12 hamburger, get a $9 French dip and tip the difference!”

Makes sense to me!

Rob adds, “Totally agree!! My wife has been a waitress for 16 years and people are rude, messy and don’t care what their kids do at the table. Totally agree Jim.”

Peter says, “My wife Edy and I have missed several birthday meals at restaurants because we abide by this philosophy. Same with Veteran’s Day, Mother’s Day, etc.”

Ron’s take, “Eat at restaurants that have good service. If you have bad service just don’t go back. We dine with three to six other couples on Fridays and over the years I can only think of a couple of times the service was bad.”

Cindy writes, “Go to Salar on Friday or Saturday night and ask for Steve. Guaranteed great food and fabulous service!”

Gosh Steve, I think you need to tip Cindy after that ringing endorsement.

Eileen feels you: “The number one reason I don’t go out these days. I hate not being able to tip well, especially after having walked in their shoes.”

Think I got Darin worked up: “If the service isn’t good I don’t leave a good tip. It’s that simple and why are customers responsible for the salary of waiters and waitresses? I don’t get tips and I work really hard. Restaurants make a lot of money! They could afford to pay their servers more but they don’t because they want customers to tip. I am so sick of this argument. If servers want good tips they should earn it and not just expect it.”

And finally from Don, “Tip? We’re supposed to tip?”

Always a funnyman in the group.

Thanks for all your comments, suggestions and … tips!

Cheers,

Buch

For over 25 years, Jim Bucher has been a regionally known and loved local television icon. “Buch’s” followers describe him as trustworthy, fun, the guy next door, a friend and role model. You can promote your business with Buch and grab your customer’s attention! Reach DCP freelance writer Jim Bucher at JimBucher@DaytonCityPaper.com

Tags: , ,

Jim Bucher
For over 25 years, Jim Bucher has been a regionally known and loved local television icon. “Buch’s” followers describe him as trustworthy, fun, the guy next door, a friend and role model. You can promote your business with Buch and grab your customer’s attention! Reach DCP freelance writer Jim Bucher at JimBucher@DaytonCityPaper.com.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Got an Opinion?

YourOpinionMatters

We are interested to hear what you think.  Please send us a message.  

Irish Homecoming

3-Celtic Woman 18 jpg 2

Celtic Woman at Clark State gala The four women of Celtic Woman (L-R) Tara McNeill, Mairead Carlin, Éabha McMahon, and […]

BOOM goes your twenties!

image3-1

Dare to deny the passage of time at the Mathile Theatre (L-R) Jonathan (Bobby Mitchum) seeks help through his first […]

The woes of legal weed

775_5586162

Getting your “pot card” In addition to federal and state law, local ordinances may limit growers, dispensaries, and individuals. By […]

The graying of green

1420_5772728

Ambiguity and contradictions still plague marijuana laws Despite the new law going into effect, much remains to be done for […]

Girl, we couldn’t get much higher

20170513-DSC_0455

Evil Eye Gypsy brings psychedelic rock to South Park Tavern Evil Eye Gypsy (L-R) Cat Shift, Sherree Emmons, Aaron Snyder, […]