On the road again

On the road againOn the road again

Sick/Sea just can’t wait to get on the road again

By Tim Anderl
Photo:  [l to r]: Miguel Morales, Audrey and Cameron Scott; photo credit: Christie Bentley Photography

McAllen, Texas’ Sick/Sea last visited Dayton in September 2012, just prior to the October release of Moral Compass, their first effort for Autumn + Colour Records. Dedicating themselves to a vigorous touring schedule, and with a fresh release under their belts, the band spent the final months of 2012 making waves with their multi-genre blending sound, and is busy preparing for and anticipating their first winter tour.

The band’s sound, which puts them in league with contemporaries like Copeland, Eisley and Dear and the Headlights, combines moments of indie rock, jazz and hardcore, creating a distinct and succinctly mature sound. Their songs are songs of life and love, not destruction or despair, and the reverb-laden opuses set the tone for dynamic drumming and jazz-like bass riffs.

Dayton City Paper caught up with vocalist Audrey Scott to discuss Moral Compass, being in a band with her brother (Cameron Scott), touring and what they like about Dayton.

Moral Compass was your first for Autumn + Color; how did you decide they were the right label for Sick/Sea?

We’re still a pretty young band and to get approached by a label was very exciting. We were at a point where we were ready to record our next EP, but were being held back by financing issues.  We didn’t have the money to do it and we were going to wait a year, keep playing shows and save up the money to record. Then they came at us and they were really, really awesome guys.  They’re a growing label, so we thought the arrangement of us helping them and them helping us was the natural choice. -Audrey Scott

Is there a theme within Moral Compass that ties the record together?

Yes. It is a display of my life within a tour year span of time. It touches on everything I went through, but the theme is really discovering myself and trying to figure out what I want in life. It is also me trying to figure out how not to control things too much, but letting my moral compass guide me rather than some self-imposed rulebook that I set for myself a long time ago. -AS

Is there a degree of comfort in doing the band with your brother or have you ever had sibling rivalry problems?

No, we have this bizarre ability to get along. We had the same friends, we spent a lot of time together and we learned how to work through our issues. On the road sometimes we annoy each other every now and then. Like on our first night of tour he said, “Audrey, can I talk to you outside?” I was like, “Oh great.” We argued, but agreed I’ll work on this, you work on that and we felt better by the end. We know how to compromise and not to be selfish. It was a good lesson to learn early on, even for life in general.  -AS

Coming from a place like Texas, where winters aren’t that bad, are you nervous about doing a winter tour in the northern states?

Yes. Our families are all worried for us, too. We are already a pretty careful band. We drive slow with the trailer and we have a sleeping routine to ensure that the driver is always well-rested. One of the guys we’re bringing with us this tour has travelled with a band through snowstorms, and he has a lot of knowledge and experience. He’s been packing flares and stuff like that. So we feel pretty prepared, although I’m sure nothing can totally prepare us for it.  -AS

Have you had any harrowing experiences on the road?

Um … nothing too crazy. We’ve had some nights where we needed a place to stay and some drunk people invited us to stay with them … the night typically goes downhill from there. But nothing really life threatening. We’ve been really lucky in that sense. -AS

It is fortunate for us that Dayton has made your routing over a larger Ohio city. And you’ve been here before. What was your previous experience like here?

I remember that Dayton is one of the most beautiful areas I’ve been to. I’m from deep south Texas where it is very hot and humid most of the year. There’s not a big art scene. There’s not a lot going on. It is growing, but it’s not Austin. I always keep my radar on for cities that would be nice to move to and I remember Dayton was high on that list. When I was little, I always wanted a forest in my yard and places to explore and Dayton has beautiful scenery. And everyone we met there was really nice. The guys we stayed with loved Dayton and they were telling us about all the great music that has come from the area. We had no idea. It seems like such a small, quaint city.  -AS

Sick/Sea perform on Thursday, Feb. 21at South Park Tavern, 1301 Wayne Ave. Also on the bill is Alli King. Admission is $5 for all ages. Doors at 9 p.m.  For more information and to hear music, visit facebook.com/SickSea.

Reach DCP freelance writer Tim Anderl at TimAnderl@daytoncitypaper.com


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