Regional police blotters, reported and interpretedby

Researched and reported by Ehron Ostendorf


So stupid, a caveman could do it

An officer and her partner answered a simple assault call. The victim said her and her boyfriend pulled up in her driveway, and she asked him to exit the car. Easily angered, he took her keys and phone and exited the car. With a childish response, he threw them in the front yard and went inside the house. Recruiting the help of her friend, the victim searched for her phone and keys. The boyfriend returned outside, jealous of the presence of another male near his girlfriend, he proceeded to act like a brute. He grabbed a rock and threatened the victim’s friend. The victim stood before him to make him stand down, but he forcibly grabbed her arm flinging her away. The reporting officer could see visible bruises on the victim. The friend left the scene; he didn’t want to press charges, but the victim did. She said she “didn’t want him to think he could get away with treating me like that.” He clearly needed a lesson in anger management.

 

Words like daggers

A call went out—to the operator. A man called the police operator three separate times making threats. He wanted to know why people were put in jail for “no reason” and began raving, saying he would kill police officers. He said he “wouldn’t go to jail for sh–” and that he had “lots of guns.” The police investigated the call and discovered the address, as well as a series of mental health calls from that same phone. The police arrived with caution and arrested the man who was holding the same phone he was using to make the calls, with no weapons on him. They arrested him for inducing panic to the public. Goes to show that words can be just as powerful as weapons.

Pop, lock, 

and damage it

When the officer arrived on the scene, she spoke with the contact, who reported vandalism. The owner of a business had his property damaged. It was a vacant building they usually use for storage. The son of the victim said he was the last person to be in the building. The officer and the son inspected the area; the place had been broken into before, so there was a metal panel installed over their door, which appeared to be bent from someone trying to pry it open. There was newer metal around the outside of the panel—possibly broken pieces from a device used to try and break in. Behind the panel, the son said he placed three different locks on the door. At least his security system paid off.

Mommy’s little girl

A woman arrived at her house and realized it had been broken into. She made a report, and an officer arrived to collect the information. The woman claimed it was her daughter who committed the crime because she had stolen in the past, on multiple occasions. In one example, the daughter came in the house to grab movies she owned; there was a bank bag next to the movies from the victim’s concession stand and all the money in it was gone after the daughter left. Another time, the daughter arrived and the victim’s husband realized after she left that all the cash from his wallet was missing. Someone’s not winning best daughter of the year.

STFU

A report came in of a menacing figure. The figure? A virtual menace. An officer collected the information on the incident. The victim called and said she received a text from her cousin’s phone. It was her cousin’s fiancé; they share a phone because they share everything, obviously. Regardless, this fiancé was making threats. The victim said her mother and father went over to the cousin’s house earlier in the day and argued with the fiancé. So, the fiancé decided to take it out on the daughter and threaten her instead of dealing with the issue like a grown adult. Clearly the right way to handle the situation…

Reach DCP freelance writer Ehron Ostendorf at EhronOstendorf@DaytonCityPaper.com.

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Ehron Ostendorf
Reach DCP freelance writer Ehron Ostendorf at EhronOstendorf@DaytonCityPaper.com.

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