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From romance to rifles

The incisive 19th century America of Winslow Homer By Jud Yalkut Winslow Homer (1836-1910) is one of the most influential American artists to emerge in the 19th century and to auger in the beginning of the 20th century, influencing such diverse talents as western artist Frederic Remington and the Ashcan School of Robert Henri. Essentially […]

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Swinging myself to sleep

Suffering from the dreaded insomnia? Try these ‘swinging’ methods By Caroline Shannon-Karasik It’s 3:13 a.m. and I’m awake. I’ve already, unwillingly so, opened my eyes at 12:34 a.m. and 2:26 a.m. As it is, I had a hard time falling asleep because I couldn’t get my mind to stop racing, moving through to-do lists things […]

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Synergistic braintap

When data sets plus DIY spawn art By Jane A. Black I remember the first time I heard of synchronicity. It was the name of an album by The Police that came out in 1983. My friend Jean is cringing right now, in disbelief. How could I have reached 22 years old and not have […]

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Bella Vita Gallery

Intelligent art gets smart By Katie Modras-Anible Bella Vita. Life is beautiful. Warmth and vitality are certainly words that would be aptly used to describe the opening of Bella Vita Gallery on June 18 at Front Street Studios. The event stretched down the hallway on the third floor of building 1000 after pouring out into […]

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Sunshine on My Spandex

How to beat the heat (and the sweat) with the latest in workout gear technology By Caroline Shannon-Karasik Dress for success” is a phrase we liken to men in sharp business suits or women with perfectly coiffed hair and a refined ensemble as they step into a meeting. But it’s not exactly one that is […]

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Sensuality and “Double Sexus” at the Wexner

A look at the work of sculptor Louise Bourgeois By Jud Yalkut The Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus has been known for linking together exhibitions that often share more than subliminal associations. In the current series running through July 31, a central focus is the work of sculptor Louise Bourgeois, who was the […]

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Math and Art

The same name for different things, or different names for the same thing? By Jane A. Black You have to love a guy who uses the word combinatorial. It’s not something you hear in everyday conversation – unless you hang out with mathematicians, I guess. To me, it sounds a lot like that art term, […]

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Surprise cancer risks: Blushing, fear, confusion

Your to-do list in the war against cancer and illness By Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D. Ever been scanned, screened, poked or prodded in your own war against cancer? If the answer’s yes, here’s a fact worth celebrating: You’ve earned a place in medical history. Turns out that more screenings (like yours) are […]

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Atmosphere, surface, edge

David Leach displays a linear tour de force By Jane A. Black The Present Past, a retrospective exhibition of work by Emeritus Professor David Leach, was a poetic experience. The show did not deliver a driving beat; instead, what emanated was a gentle rhythm, the cadence of the carefully chosen. “Reticence is my middle name,” […]

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Breathing a Gallery into Life

Two Artists Transform Their Studio By Jane A. Black Sarah and Mike Puckett met in New York City but settled south of Dayton when Sarah got a teaching job at Centerville High School. They are not far from her hometown (in central Ohio) and alma mater (Miami University), but the Midwest is a new adventure […]

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News of the weird 10/21

By Chuck Shepherd Lead Story – Signs of the times “Selfie fever” has begun to sully the sacred Islamic pilgrimages to […]

The last word

Thanks for reading By A.J. Wagner This will be my last week writing the “Law and Disorder” column for the […]

The art of organization

Yellow Springs Artist Studio Tour & Sale returns By Alyssa Reck Photo: Elaine Lamb of Mud Mothers Pottery will showcase […]

Waste not

The Plastic World of Mary Ellen Croteau By Shayna V. McConville Photo: Mary Ellen Croteau, “Endless Columns,” plastic bottle caps […]

On not getting by in Dayton

The long-term effects of poverty By A.J. Wagner I have been penning “Law and Disorder” for the Dayton City Paper […]

News of the weird 10/14

By Chuck Shepherd Lead Story – Bionic shoes Police in Japan’s Kyoto Prefecture raided a shoe manufacturer in July and […]